Planning

PDF Maps

This Department's function is to plan for the future needs of the County through the Comprehensive Plan, Capital Budgeting and efficient and effective regulation of the development activities within Hernando County.

Below are the downloadable PDF maps that the Planning Department makes available to the public.

Planning GIS Business Unit Contact:

Nicole Daigneault
NDaigneault@co.hernando.fl.us


Florida Circumnavigational Paddling Saltwater Trail and Attractions

This is a composite of Hernando County Parks & Recreation, attractions, and businesses of interest to users of the FDEP Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail (commonly referred to as The CT) between Bayport, Pine Island, and Weeki Wachee. Beginning at Big Lagoon State Park near Pensacola, extending around the Florida peninsula and Keys, and ending at Fort Clinch State Park near the Georgia border, the CT is a 1,515-mile sea kayaking paradise. The trail includes every Florida coastal habitat type, from barrier island dune systems to salt marsh to mangroves. Numerous historical sites and points of interest are accessible by kayak along with colorful fishing communities and urban centers. If you are planning a through trip on the CT please let the Office of Greenways &Trails (OGT) know a little about your plans and any questions. The OGT would also appreciate your comments and updates to keep the maps and segment guides up to date.

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Future Land Use Map (FLUM)

The FLUM defines Land Use categories for the future development of Unincorporated Hernando County, Florida as part of the Hernando County Comprehensive Plan. Mapping Criteria and Land Uses Allowed are defined for each category. The City of Brooksville also maintains a separate Future Land Use Map for the area within the city limits.

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General Highway Map of Hernando County

The General Highway Map (GHM) of Hernando County, Florida contains geographic data, i.e., airport runways and taxiways, conservation land, county DRA and DROW, critical facilities, golf courses, incorporated areas, parks and recreational areas, power lines, railroads, streets and highways, subdivisions, and water features. The GHM is maintained by Hernando County Planning GIS with additional data provided by the Addressing Office, the City of Brooksville, the City of Weeki Wachee, the Hernando County Property Appraiser, the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), and state agencies, i.e., the Florida Department of Environmental Protection; all of the GHM data is in the Central GIS Library and is available for purchase from Central GIS, Office of the Hernando County Property Appraiser in Brooksville, Florida. The GHM measures 42” x 86” and requires a wide format plotter to print the entire map on one page.

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NCSS Elements of Wildlife Habitat Coniferous Plants

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Coniferous Plants as elements of wildlife habitat and include cone-bearing trees, shrubs, or ground cover plants that furnish habitat or supply food in the form of browse, seeds, or fruitlike cones. Examples are pine, cedar, and cypress. Soil properties that have a major effect on the growth of coniferous plants are depth of the root zone, available water capacity, and wetness.

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NCSS Elements of Wildlife Habitat Grain & Seed Crops

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Grain and Seed Crops as elements of wildlife habitat and include seed-producing annuals used by wildlife. Examples are corn, sorghum, millet, rye, cowpeas, soybeans, and sunflowers. The major soil properties that affect the growth of grain and seed crops are depth of the root zone, texture of the surface layer, available water capacity, wetness, slope, surface stoniness, and flood hazard. Soil temperature and soil moisture are also considerations.

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NCSS Elements of Wildlife Habitat Grasses & Legumes

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Grasses and Legumes as elements of wildlife habitat and include domestic perennial grasses and herbaceous legumes that are planted for wildlife food and cover. Examples are bahiagrass, lovegrass, switchgrass, annual lespedeza, pangolagrass, clover, trefoil, and hairy indigo. Major soil properties that affect the growth of grasses and legumes are depth of the root zone, texture of the surface layer, available water capacity, wetness, surface stoniness, flood hazard, and slope. Soil temperature and soil moisture are also considerations.

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NCSS Elements of Wildlife Habitat Hardwood Trees

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Hardwood Trees as elements of wildlife habitat and include the associated woody understory as cover for wildlife that produces nuts and other fruit, buds, catkins, twigs, bark, or foliage which wildlife eat. Examples of native plants are oak, magnolia, cherry, sweetgum, maple, hawthorn, dogwood, persimmon, sassafras, sumac, hickory, cabbage, palm, beautyberry, blackberry, grape, inkberry, saw-palmetto, viburnum, huckleberry, bayberry, and briers. Examples of fruit-producing shrubsthat are commercially available and suitable for planting on soils rated good are Russian-olive, autumn-olive, and crabapple. Major soil properties that affect growth of hardwood trees and shrubs are depth of the root zone, available water capacity, and wetness.

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NCSS Elements of Wildlife Habitat Shallow Water Areas

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Shallow Water Areas as elements of wildlife habitat and include bodies of water that have an average depth of less than 5 feet and that are useful to wildlife. They can be naturally wet areas, or they can be created by dams or levees or by water-control devices in marshes or streams. Examples are coastal marshes, waterfowl feeding areas, and ponds. Major soil properties affecting shallow water areas are depth to bedrock, wetness, surface stoniness, slope, and permeability. The availability of a dependable water supply is important if water areas are to be developed.

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NCSS Elements of Wildlife Habitat Wetland Plants

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Wetland Plants as elements of wildlife habitat and include annual and perennial wild herbaceous plants that grow on moist or wet sites, exclusive of submerged or floating aquatics. They produce food or cover for wildlife that use wetland as habitat. Examples of wetland plants are smartweed, wild millet, wildrice, saltgrass, and cordgrass, rushes, sedges, and reeds. Major soil properties affecting wetland plants are texture of the surface layer, wetness, reaction, salinity, slope, and surface stoniness.

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NCSS Elements of Wildlife Habitat Wild Herbaceous Plants

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Wild Herbaceous Plants as elements of wildlife habitat and include native or naturally established grasses and forbs, including weeds, that provide food and cover for wildlife. Examples are bluestem, indiangrass, goldenrod, beggarweed, pokewood, partridgepea, deer vetch, and grama. Major soil properties that affect the growth of these plants are depth of the root zone, texture of the surface layer, available water capacity, wetness, surface stoniness, and flood hazard. Soil temperature and soil moisture are also considerations.

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NCSS Kinds of Wildlife Habitat Openland Wildlife

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Openland Wildlife Habitat as cropland, pasture, meadows, and areas that are overgrown with grasses, herbs, shrubs, and vines. These areas produce grain and seed crops, grasses and legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. The kinds of wildlife attracted to these areas include bobwhite, quail, meadowlark, field sparrow, cottontail rabbit, red fox, and doves.

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NCSS Kinds of Wildlife Habitat Wetland Wildlife

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Woodland Wildlife Habitat as areas of hardwoods or conifers, or a mixture of both, and associated grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Wildlife attracted to these areas include wild turkey, woodcock, thrushes, vireos, woodpeckers, squirrels, grey fox, racoon, deer, and black bear.

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NCSS Kinds of Wildlife Habitat Woodland Wildlife

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines Wetland Wildlife Habitat as areas of open, marshy or swampy, shallow-water areas where water-tolerant plants grow. Some of the wildlife attracted to such areas are ducks, geese, herons, shore birds, rails, kingfishers, alligators, and otters.

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NCSS Woodland Management Equipment Limitation

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) Woodland Management ratings of Equipment Limitation reflect the characteristics and condition of the soil that restrict use of the equipment generally needed in woodland management or harvesting. A rating of slight indicates that use of equipment is not limited to a particular kind of equipment or time of year; moderate indicates a short seasonal limitation or a need for some modification in management or equipment; severe indicates a seasonal limitation, a need for special equipment or management, or a hazard in the use of equipment.

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NCSS Woodland Management Erosion Hazard

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) Woodland Management ratings of the Erosion Hazard indicate the risk of loss of soil in well-managed woodland. The risk is slight if the expected soil loss is small, moderate if some measures are needed to control erosion during logging and road construction, and severe if intensive management or special equipment and methods are needed to prevent excessive loss of soil.

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NCSS Woodland Management Plant Competition

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) Woodland Management ratings of Plant Competition indicate the degree to which undesirable plants are expected to invade or grow if openings are made in the tree canopy. The invading plants compete with native plants or planted seedlings by impeding or preventing their growth. A rating of slight indicates little or no competition from other plants; moderate indicates that plant competition is expected to hinder the development of a fully stocked stand of desirable trees; severe means that plant competition is expected to prevent the establishment of a desirable stand unless the site is intensively prepared, weeded, or otherwise managed for the control of undesirable plants.

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NCSS Woodland Management Seedling Mortality

National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) Woodland Management ratings of Seedling Mortality indicate the degree that the soil affects expected mortality of planted tree seedlings when plant competition is not a limiting factor. Seedlings from good planting stock that are properly planted during a period of sufficient rainfall are rated. A rating of slight indicates that the expected mortality of the planted seedlings is less than 25%; moderate, 25 to 50 percent; and severe, more than 50 percent.

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Nobleton, Florida

Within the Future Land Use Element of the Hernando County Comprehensive Plan, Policies 1.01B(11) and (12), the community of Nobleton is recognized as a Rural Community. With the planned re-adoption of the entire Hernando County Comprehensive Plan over the next several years, the boundaries of other Rural Communities in Hernando County will be revisited as to development density. Separately, at the 2010 Census, the US Census Bureau cataloged 21 Unincorporated Places in Hernando County, some of which could be defined as Rural. (CDP - Census Designated Place - Unincorporated) The boundaries of the Nobleton CDP were drawn by Census computers based upon Census criteria.

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Traffic Analysis Zones

Each spring, traffic counters with the pneumatic road tubes, provide detailed data to better manage traffic operations and project planning. Traffic data and Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) are used to model the number of future vehicle trips produced and attracted within particular neighborhoods of Hernando County. Some TAZ's are more residential in nature, and others attempt to measure commercial, institutional, or industrial traffic. There are presently 236 TAZ's in Hernando County shown on this map.

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